JUDGMENT
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Judgments of God [Easton Bible Dictionary]


Judging; Judgment [ISBE]

juj'-ing, juj'-ment:

Often in the Old Testament for "to act as a magistrate" (Exodus 18:13; Deuteronomy 1:16; 16:18, etc.), justice being administered generally by "elders" (Exodus 18:13-27), or "kings" (1 Samuel 8:20) or "priests" (Deuteronomy 18:15);

applied to God as the Supreme Judge (Psalms 9:7-8; 10:18; 96:13; Micah 4:3, etc.; Psalms 7:8: "Yahweh ministereth judgment," vividly describes a court scene, with Yahweh as Judge).

Often in the New Testament, ethically, for

(1) "to decide," "give a verdict," "declare an opinion" (Greek krino);

(2) "to investigate," "scrutinize" (Greek anakrino);

(3) "to discriminate," "distinguish" (Greek diakrino).

For (1), see Luke 7:43; Acts 15:19;

for (2) see 1 Corinthians 2:15; 4:3;

for (3)see 1 Corinthians 11:31; 14:29 m.

Used also forensically in Luke 22:30; Acts 25:10; and applied to God in John 5:22; Hebrews 10:30.

The judgments of God are the expression of His justice, the formal declarations of His judgments, whether embodied

in words (Deuteronomy 5:1 the King James Version, the Revised Version (British and American) "statutes"),

or deeds (Exodus 6:6; Revelation 16:7),

or in decisions that are yet to be published (Psalms 36:6).

Man's consciousness of guilt inevitably associates God's judgments as declarations of the Divine justice, with his own condemnation, i.e. he knows that a strict exercise of justice means his condemnation, and thus "judgment" and "condemnation" become in his mind synonymous (Romans 5:16); hence, the prayer of Psalms 143:2, "Enter not into judgment"; also, John 6:29, "the resurrection of judgment" (the King James Version "damnation"); 1 Corinthians 11:29, "eateth and drinketh judgment" (the King James Version "damnation").

H. E. Jacobs


Judgment Hall [EBD]

Gr. praitorion (John 18:28,33; 19:9; Matthew 27:27), "common hall." In all these passages the Revised Version renders "palace." In Mark 15:16 the word is rendered "Praetorium" (q.v.), which is a Latin word, meaning literally the residence of the praetor, and then the governor's residence in general, though not a praetor. Throughout the Gospels the word "praitorion" has this meaning (Compare Acts 23:35). Pilate's official residence when he was in Jerusalem was probably a part of the fortress of Antonia.

The trial of our Lord was carried on in a room or office of the palace. The "whole band" spoken of by Mark were gathered together in the palace court.


Judgment Hall [SBD]

The word praetorium is so translated five times in the Authorized Version of the New Testament, and in those five passages it denotes two different places.

  • 1. In (John 18:28,33; 19:9) it is the residence which Pilate occupied when he visited Jerusalem. The site of Pilateís praetorium in Jerusalem has given rise to much dispute, some supposing it to be the palace of King Herod, others the tower of Antonia; but it was probably the latter, which was then and long afterward the citadel of Jerusalem.
  • 2. In (Acts 23:35) Herodís judgment hall or praetorium in Caesarea was doubtless a part of that magnificent range of buildings the erection of which by King Herod is described in Josephus. The word "palace," or "Caesarís court." in the Authorized Version of (Philemon 1:13) is a translation of the same word praetorium. It may here have denoted the quarter of that detachment of the praetorian guards which was in immediate attendance upon the emperor, and had barracks in Mount Palatine at Rome.


Judgment Hall [ISBE]

juj'-ment hol (to praitorion, "Then led they Jesus .... unto the hall of judgment .... and they themselves went not into the judgment hall" (John 18:28 the King James Version); "Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall again" (John 18:33 the King James Version); "(Pilate) went again into the judgment hall" (John 19:9); "He commanded him to be kept in Herod's judgment hall" (Acts 23:35)):

"Judgment hall" is one of the ways in which the King James Version translates praitorion, which it elsewhere renders "Praetorium" (Mark 15:16); "the common hall" (Matthew 27:27). In this passage the English Revised Version renders it "palace"; in John 18:33; 19:9; Acts 23:35, "palace" is also given by the English Revised Version; in Philippians 1:13, the King James Version renders, "palace," while the Revised Version (British and American) gives "the praetorian guard." Praitorion accordingly is translated in all these ways, "Praetorium," "the common hall," "the judgment hall," "the palace," "the praetorian guard." In the passages In the Gospels, the American Standard Revised Version renders uniformly "Praetorium."

The word originally meant the headquarters in the Roman camp, the space where the general's tent stood, with the camp altar; the tent of the commander-in-chief. It next came to mean the military council, meeting in the general's tent. Then it came to be applied to the palace in which the Roman governor or procurator of a province resided. In Jerusalem it was the magnificent palace which Herod the Great had built for himself, and which the Roman procurators seem to have occupied when they came from Caesarea to Jerusalem to transact public business.

Praitorion in Philippians 1:13 has been variously rendered, "the camp of the praetorian soldiers," "the praetorian guard," etc. For what is now believed to be its true meaning, see PRAETORIUM .

John Rutherfurd


Judgment [Thompson Chain Reference]

According to Privilege

According to Works

Forbidden (also Mercy) Last, The - General References to Line of (the divine) Universal


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